Willmar Ambulance Service

When every moment counts, you can rely on us.

Willmar Ambulance Service provides multiple levels of care and transportation including Basic Life Support and Advanced Life Support. The service:

  • Responds to more than 3,000 calls each year
  • Has an ambulance dispatched within 90 seconds for 90 percent of calls
  • Includes staff trained in IV therapy along with emergency medical technicians (EMTs) trained to assist paramedics with medication administration

We also participate in many community events to bring assistance, education and information to the community. Some of the topics we cover include:

  • First aid (education and certification)
  • CPR (education and certification)
  • AED training
  • Assistance in purchasing automated external defibrillators (AEDs)
  • Ambulance tours
  • Talks with children
  • Babysitting safety education

Ambulance Transfers

Willmar Ambulance paramedics are trained for Advanced Life Support (ALS), Basic Life Support (BLS) and Critical Care transports. Patient transfers are taken from Carris Health, local clinics and Level IV Trauma hospitals within the region to Level I or Level II Trauma hospitals in Minnesota. Carris Health - Rice Memorial Hospital is a Level III Trauma hospital.

To schedule an interfacility transfer, please call the Staffing Office: 320-231-4212

Download Transfer Packet

Rapid Entry System

The KNOX-BOX Rapid Entry System is a secure, rapid entry program specifically developed for fire departments and ambulance services. It provides non-destructive emergency access to commercial and residential properties. A KNOX-BOX is a small box that contains a master key to gain access to the property when no one is available to open the door.

For information on getting a KNOX-BOX Rapid Entry System for your property, please contact Willmar Ambulance Service: 320-231-4568

Featured Patient Story

Time Saves Brain When Treating Stroke Willmar Ambulance Services Patient Story
An A-typical Morning Maria Perry had just brewed her morning coffee on Thursday, March 24, when her right arm began shaking violently as she lifted the pot. She had steadied herself enough to put the pot back on the counter when her right leg suddenly collapsed. “After my leg gave out, I was pretty sure things were not okay. I wondered if I was having a stroke, but I’m only 47 years old,” said Perry, who works in customer service ...
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